Permaculture Principle #2: Catch and Store Energy

By Tim Sonder, Education Chair

"Make hay while the sun shines"

This principle deals with the capture and storage of energy, within the environment, buildings and even society.

Energy is fleeting and essential for life systems and society. Capture it now, so you can use it (or have it) later.

This is the true meaning of conservation.

It’s harvest time. When we pick fruit or vegetables we are catching energy. And possibly storing it for later.

2018 Food Forest & Orchard Work and Learn Days

The Eggleston Anniversary Food Forest and Orchard is a diverse planting of perennial edible trees, shrubs and smaller plants— including fruits, vegetables, nuts, and herbs—designed to mimic the natural balance of a forest by utilizing permaculture principles.

We welcome the community to get involved by learning about what we are doing, helping us plan next steps, and helping to maintain our Food Forest located in Eggleston Park.

We have great volunteer opportunities for individuals, families and groups thru regular monthly work days that frequently include learning presentations. (We are happy to arrange other special volunteer days for groups as needed. For more information, please email foodforestcommittee[at]edibleevanston[dot]org.)

Eggleston Anniversary Food Forest & Orchard
2100 Hartrey, south of Payne, west of Bridge, north of McCormick
Evanston IL 60201

A waiver will be required to participate as a volunteer. You can sign it on-site, but if you are under 18 years old a parent or guardian must sign. The release is available here. And you may print it and bring a copy with you. No other registration is required.

2018 Educational Work-and-Learn Days Schedule

Look for additional activities on most workdays—educational presentations, sharing of food, stories, song. Including:

Permaculture Primer: An introduction

By Tim Sonder, Education chair

If you have been volunteering with Edible Evanston you have, no doubt, been hearing about “Permaculture.” But what is it?

Most of the techniques applied by those working with permaculture aren’t revolutionary, they are evolutionary. But the way of looking at the world—and I mean that in the broadest sense—often feels revolutionary. Permaculture becomes a way of framing one’s outlook. And that can be applied not just to agriculture, but also to architecture and engineering, to urban planning, and to societal questions.

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